Jul 23, 2014
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Small Business Case Study
A Seattle Retailer Builds on the Lessons of a Failed Store in New York
“In 2011, we published a case study on Glassybaby, a Seattle creator and retailer of hand-blown glass  cups used as candleholders. The company had opened a store in New York City, where it was struggling…Weighing her sales figures against the cost to operate in Manhattan, she closed the store in August 2012.
In the two years since then, Ms. Rhodes has taken the lessons she learned and applied them to opening a new store in San Francisco and to selling online. Today, Glassybaby offers its cups in 400 colors and employs 170 people (including 70 glassblowers). The company is on track to produce $9 million in revenue this year, up 36 percent from last year.”
The New York Times, "A Seattle Retailer Builds on the Lessons of a Failed Store in New York" by Julie Weed, July 23, 2014.
 

Small Business Case Study

A Seattle Retailer Builds on the Lessons of a Failed Store in New York

In 2011, we published a case study on Glassybaby, a Seattle creator and retailer of hand-blown glass  cups used as candleholders. The company had opened a store in New York City, where it was struggling…Weighing her sales figures against the cost to operate in Manhattan, she closed the store in August 2012.

In the two years since then, Ms. Rhodes has taken the lessons she learned and applied them to opening a new store in San Francisco and to selling online. Today, Glassybaby offers its cups in 400 colors and employs 170 people (including 70 glassblowers). The company is on track to produce $9 million in revenue this year, up 36 percent from last year.”

The New York Times, "A Seattle Retailer Builds on the Lessons of a Failed Store in New York" by Julie Weed, July 23, 2014.

 

Jul 22, 2014
23 notes
fastcompany:

As the Batman 75th anniversary further fuels the controversy over who created the Caped Crusader, a DC Comics historian offers more insight.
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fastcompany:

As the Batman 75th anniversary further fuels the controversy over who created the Caped Crusader, a DC Comics historian offers more insight.

Read More>

Jul 11, 2014
959 notes

fastcompany:

America’s Oddly Beautiful Suburban Sprawl, Photographed From The Sky

Urban sprawl is the type of thing you tend to forget about if you’re living in it, except maybe when you’re stuck in traffic inching home after work. But it does a lot more than cause road rage: Sprawl also makes us fatter, sicker, and poorer, and it’s the source of half of the country’s household carbon footprint. In a series of photos taken over seven years, now published in a new book called Ciphers, photographer Christoph Gielen shows a different perspective on sprawl, intended to get more people to question typical patterns of development.

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Jul 10, 2014
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Saving Water in California

California is in the third year of its worst drought in decades. But you wouldn’t know it by looking at how much water the state’s residents and businesses are using. According to a recent state survey, Californians cut the amount of water they used in the first five months of the year by just 5 percent, far short of the 20 percent reduction Gov. Jerry Brown called for in January. In some parts of the state, like the San Diego area, water use has actually increased from 2013.”

The New York Times, "Saving Water in California" by The New York Times Editorial Board, July 9, 2014.

Jul 3, 2014
1 note
Ruth Bader Ginsburg is emerging as an Internet sensation
"Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg garnered a lot of media attention this week for her scathing dissent on the Court’s Burwell v. Hobby Lobby ruling, and it has not all come from the usual sources. Outside the pages of major newspapers and scholarly law reviews, the dissent is fast becoming immortalized within the worlds of social media and popular culture.”
NPR, "Ruth Bader Ginsburg is Emerging as an Internet Sensation" by Nora Daly, July 2, 2014. 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg is emerging as an Internet sensation

"Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg garnered a lot of media attention this week for her scathing dissent on the Court’s Burwell v. Hobby Lobby ruling, and it has not all come from the usual sources. Outside the pages of major newspapers and scholarly law reviews, the dissent is fast becoming immortalized within the worlds of social media and popular culture.”

NPR, "Ruth Bader Ginsburg is Emerging as an Internet Sensation" by Nora Daly, July 2, 2014. 

Jun 30, 2014
36 notes

Bitcoin Transactions Are Now Legal In California

fastcompany:

“In an era of evolving payment methods, from Amazon Coins to Starbucks Stars, it is impractical to ignore the growing use of cash alternatives,” Assemblyman Roger Dickinson, the bill’s author, said in a statement.

Jun 30, 2014
31 notes
fastcompany:

Are Americans’ Environmental Attitudes Finally Changing?
A new poll suggests that Americans care about the planetary impact of fossil fuels more than cheap electricity.
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fastcompany:

Are Americans’ Environmental Attitudes Finally Changing?

A new poll suggests that Americans care about the planetary impact of fossil fuels more than cheap electricity.

Read More>

Jun 27, 2014
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Jun 18, 2014
98 notes
Jun 18, 2014
1 note
U.S. Patent Office Cancels Redskins Trademark Registration
"In the latest blow to the N.F.L.’s defense of the Redskins as a team name, the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, part of the United States Patent and Trademark Office, canceled the trademark registration of the name Redskins for use in connection with a professional football team, saying that “a substantial composite of Native Americans found the term Redskins to be disparaging.”
The New York Times, “U.S. Patent Office Cancels Redskins Trademark Registration” by Ken Belson and Edward Wyatt, June 18, 2014.

U.S. Patent Office Cancels Redskins Trademark Registration

"In the latest blow to the N.F.L.’s defense of the Redskins as a team name, the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, part of the United States Patent and Trademark Office, canceled the trademark registration of the name Redskins for use in connection with a professional football team, saying that “a substantial composite of Native Americans found the term Redskins to be disparaging.”

The New York Times, U.S. Patent Office Cancels Redskins Trademark Registration” by Ken Belson and Edward Wyatt, June 18, 2014.

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