Apr 22, 2014
0 notes
How Much Pomegranate and Blueberry Juice is There?
"The label shows a pomegranate and blueberries in front of an apple and grapes. The juices are dyed dark purple. But the beverage contains no more than trace amounts of the two featured juices. It is 0.3 percent pomegranate juice and 0.2 percent blueberry juice. Pom Wonderful, which sells pomegranate juice, is suing for false advertising.
Mr. Waxman said there must be limits to how far companies could go on their labels.
“Coke’s argument, and for that matter the government’s argument, with respect to the name itself, would apply,” he said, “if, unlike the eyedropper’s worth of pomegranate juice that’s in the half-gallon bottle, there were two microns.”
Ms. Sullivan, the Coca-Cola lawyer, remained poised.
“We’re not talking here about safety,” she said. “We’re talking here about labeling so that consumers have adequate information, at the same time as manufacturers are not put to the burdens and inefficiencies of having constantly shifting labeling standards imposed by juries, which ultimately will cost more to the consumer.””

The New York Times, "Skeptical Justice Scolds Coca-Cola on Juice Label" by Adam Liptak, April 21, 2014.

How Much Pomegranate and Blueberry Juice is There?

"The label shows a pomegranate and blueberries in front of an apple and grapes. The juices are dyed dark purple. But the beverage contains no more than trace amounts of the two featured juices. It is 0.3 percent pomegranate juice and 0.2 percent blueberry juice. Pom Wonderful, which sells pomegranate juice, is suing for false advertising.

Mr. Waxman said there must be limits to how far companies could go on their labels.

“Coke’s argument, and for that matter the government’s argument, with respect to the name itself, would apply,” he said, “if, unlike the eyedropper’s worth of pomegranate juice that’s in the half-gallon bottle, there were two microns.”

Ms. Sullivan, the Coca-Cola lawyer, remained poised.

“We’re not talking here about safety,” she said. “We’re talking here about labeling so that consumers have adequate information, at the same time as manufacturers are not put to the burdens and inefficiencies of having constantly shifting labeling standards imposed by juries, which ultimately will cost more to the consumer.””

The New York Times, "Skeptical Justice Scolds Coca-Cola on Juice Label" by Adam Liptak, April 21, 2014.

Apr 18, 2014
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"Might downloading a 50-cent coupon for Cheerios cost you legal rights?
General Mills, the maker of cereals like Cheerios and Chex as well as brands like Bisquick and Betty Crocker, has quietly added language to its website to alert consumers that they give up their right to sue the company if they download coupons, “join” it in online communities like Facebook, enter a company-sponsored sweepstakes or contest or interact with it in a variety of other ways.
Instead, anyone who has received anything that could be construed as a benefit and who then has a dispute with the company over its products will have to use informal negotiation via email or go through arbitration to seek relief, according to the new terms posted on its site.”
The New York Times, "When ‘Liking’ a Brand Online Voids the Right to Sue" by Stephanie Strom, April 16, 2014.

"Might downloading a 50-cent coupon for Cheerios cost you legal rights?

General Mills, the maker of cereals like Cheerios and Chex as well as brands like Bisquick and Betty Crocker, has quietly added language to its website to alert consumers that they give up their right to sue the company if they download coupons, “join” it in online communities like Facebook, enter a company-sponsored sweepstakes or contest or interact with it in a variety of other ways.

Instead, anyone who has received anything that could be construed as a benefit and who then has a dispute with the company over its products will have to use informal negotiation via email or go through arbitration to seek relief, according to the new terms posted on its site.”

The New York Times, "When ‘Liking’ a Brand Online Voids the Right to Sue" by Stephanie Strom, April 16, 2014.

Apr 8, 2014
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More Companies Bow to Investors With a Social Cause

So far this year, environmental and social issues have accounted for 56% of shareholder proposals, representing a majority for the first time, according to accounting firm Ernst & Young LLP. That is up from about 40% in the previous two years, and means shareholders are increasingly voting on things like greenhouse-gas emissions, political spending and labor rights…

The shareholders who push for these proposals aren’t agitating for higher returns like activists Dan Loeb and Carl Icahn, but rather are long-term investors at pension funds, unions and coalitions of socially conscious shareholders.”

The Wall Street Journal, "More Companies Bow to Investors with a Social Cause" by Emily Chasan, April 1, 2014.

Apr 7, 2014
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Online Dating Tricks, Gamification, and Cold Hard Cash: Is This the Future of Funding Good Causes?

A Pennsylvania startup set out to collect better data and build a sort of eHarmony for philanthropy with an eye on wealthy millennials. 

“I calculated what it would take for me to meet each of them once, and it would have taken me three-and-a-half years,” Black recalls.” …

Fast Company, "Online Dating Tricks, Gamification, and Cold Hard Cash: Is This the Future of Funding Good Causes?" by Lorraine Sanders, April 3, 2014.

Apr 4, 2014
109 notes
Apr 1, 2014
42 notes

The World's Top 10 Most Innovative Companies In Food

fastcompany:

Newly engineered foods. A TV show satirizing Big Ag. Farming practices that reduce greenhouse gases. Here are the companies that are cooking up new ideas and changing how we think about our food. 

Apr 1, 2014
40 notes
fastcompany:

Asteroid mining, orbital 3-D printing, and—of course—manned spaceflight are all part of the modern-day space race. Read>

fastcompany:

Asteroid mining, orbital 3-D printing, and—of course—manned spaceflight are all part of the modern-day space race. Read>

Mar 28, 2014
0 notes
Why Wu-Tang Will Release Just One Copy Of Its Secret Album
"Like the work of a master Impressionist, it will truly be one-of-a-kind—in lieu of a traditional major label or independent launch, the iconic hip-hop collective will make and sell just one copy of the album. And similar to a Monet or a Degas, the price tag will be a multimillion-dollar figure.
“We’re about to sell an album like nobody else sold it before,” says Robert “RZA” Diggs, the first Wu-Tang member to speak on record about Once Upon A Time In Shaolin, in an exclusive interview with FORBES. “We’re about to put out a piece of art like nobody else has done in the history of [modern] music.  We’re making a single-sale collector’s item. This is like somebody having the scepter of an Egyptian king.”
Wu-Tang’s aim is to use the album as a springboard for the reconsideration of music as art, hoping the approach will help restore it to a place alongside great visual works–and create a shift in the music business, not to mention earn some cash, in the process.”
Forbes, "Why Wu-Tang Will Release Just One Copy of Its Secret Album" by Zack O’Malley Greenberg, March 26, 2014. 

Why Wu-Tang Will Release Just One Copy Of Its Secret Album

"Like the work of a master Impressionist, it will truly be one-of-a-kind—in lieu of a traditional major label or independent launch, the iconic hip-hop collective will make and sell just one copy of the album. And similar to a Monet or a Degas, the price tag will be a multimillion-dollar figure.

“We’re about to sell an album like nobody else sold it before,” says Robert “RZA” Diggs, the first Wu-Tang member to speak on record about Once Upon A Time In Shaolin, in an exclusive interview with FORBES. “We’re about to put out a piece of art like nobody else has done in the history of [modern] music.  We’re making a single-sale collector’s item. This is like somebody having the scepter of an Egyptian king.”

Wu-Tang’s aim is to use the album as a springboard for the reconsideration of music as art, hoping the approach will help restore it to a place alongside great visual works–and create a shift in the music business, not to mention earn some cash, in the process.”

Forbes, "Why Wu-Tang Will Release Just One Copy of Its Secret Album" by Zack O’Malley Greenberg, March 26, 2014. 

Mar 21, 2014
849 notes
fastcompany:

This Man Will Give 10% Of His Salary To Fund Another Minority Developer If His Indiegogo Campaign Succeeds
Crowdfunding has become a popular means to turn concepts into products, but one man is turning to Indiegogo in hopes of financing his tuition at a coding bootcamp. But there’s a twist to his campaign: If funded, Lex Alexander says he’ll pay it forward, pledging 10% of his salary for the next two years to finance a minority or female developer to attend a hack school of his or her choosing. “All I ask is they do the same for the next person, and so on,” Alexander told Fast Company.

fastcompany:

This Man Will Give 10% Of His Salary To Fund Another Minority Developer If His Indiegogo Campaign Succeeds

Crowdfunding has become a popular means to turn concepts into products, but one man is turning to Indiegogo in hopes of financing his tuition at a coding bootcamp. But there’s a twist to his campaign: If funded, Lex Alexander says he’ll pay it forward, pledging 10% of his salary for the next two years to finance a minority or female developer to attend a hack school of his or her choosing. “All I ask is they do the same for the next person, and so on,” Alexander told Fast Company.

Mar 20, 2014
0 notes

For Some Retail Brands, Lifetime Guarantees Never Went Out of Fashion No expiration, no questions asked

“We make the product, and that’s the difference,” says Cabot, who explains that the fad of fast fashion, coupled with offshore manufacturing, have conspired to kill off the guarantees that were once a given with consumer brands. “There are segments of the market that don’t expect—or it’s never occurred to them—that something should last more than 30 or 90 days,” he says. “In the race to outsource, to get new product into people’s hands, brands have stopped talking about guarantees because they don’t need to talk about it.”

Adweek, For Some Retail Brands, Lifetime Guarantees Never Went Out of Fashion” by Robert Klara, March 17, 2014. 

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