Oct 21, 2014
0 notes
A Domestic Violence Lawyer with a Big Idea
"…Canlas is worth paying attention to, not for her track record (which is limited) but for her big idea. The young attorney, who represents victims of domestic violence, has a potentially explosive idea about the law: Bring civil suits against domestic abusers, not just criminal ones."
Ozy, "A Domestic Violence Lawyer with a Big Idea" by Sanjena Sathian.

A Domestic Violence Lawyer with a Big Idea

"…Canlas is worth paying attention to, not for her track record (which is limited) but for her big idea. The young attorney, who represents victims of domestic violence, has a potentially explosive idea about the law: Bring civil suits against domestic abusers, not just criminal ones."

Ozy, "A Domestic Violence Lawyer with a Big Idea" by Sanjena Sathian.

Oct 14, 2014
0 notes
Converse Sues to Protect Its Chuck Taylor All Stars
“Now Converse, the century-old American footwear maker, says some of the core elements of its widely recognizable Chuck Taylor sneakers — black stripes and a rubber toe topper — are being co-opted by Walmart, Kmart, Skechers and others. And it is taking them to court, accusing 31 companies of trademark infringement in 22 separate lawsuits filed Tuesday in United States District Court in Brooklyn…
Trademark infringement, however, is difficult to prove in the fashion world. The law does not allow companies to protect aspects of their designs that are functional, and companies must also prove that consumers associate the specific design with the manufacturer, not just that a given design is popular.
“It can’t just be that consumers like your design,” said R. Polk Wagner, a professor of law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School who specializes in intellectual property. “It can’t just be that your design is different or novel or interesting. It has to be that consumers associate the design with the source of the design. The functionality limitation and the requirement that the design identify source makes it pretty difficult to win these cases.””
The New York Times, "Converse Sues to Protect Its Chuck Taylor All Stars" by Rachel Abrams, October 14, 2014.

Converse Sues to Protect Its Chuck Taylor All Stars

Now Converse, the century-old American footwear maker, says some of the core elements of its widely recognizable Chuck Taylor sneakers — black stripes and a rubber toe topper — are being co-opted by Walmart, Kmart, Skechers and others. And it is taking them to court, accusing 31 companies of trademark infringement in 22 separate lawsuits filed Tuesday in United States District Court in Brooklyn…

Trademark infringement, however, is difficult to prove in the fashion world. The law does not allow companies to protect aspects of their designs that are functional, and companies must also prove that consumers associate the specific design with the manufacturer, not just that a given design is popular.

“It can’t just be that consumers like your design,” said R. Polk Wagner, a professor of law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School who specializes in intellectual property. “It can’t just be that your design is different or novel or interesting. It has to be that consumers associate the design with the source of the design. The functionality limitation and the requirement that the design identify source makes it pretty difficult to win these cases.””

The New York Times, "Converse Sues to Protect Its Chuck Taylor All Stars" by Rachel Abrams, October 14, 2014.

Oct 3, 2014
0 notes

Impact Investing: Time for New Terminology?

"In recent years there has been a real buzz about impact investing—an investment approach that intentionally seeks both a financial return and a measurable social impact. But there is little consensus over what impact investing actually is. Tesla with its solar energy cars; biotech companies with tuberculosis, HIV, and malaria vaccines; and others claim to create impact. In a recent brochure, Goldman Sachs claimed that it was producing huge, global social impact through its investment activities in infrastructure, energy, and telecom.

So what is an impact company?”

Stanford Social Innovation Review, "Impact Investing: Time for New Terminology?" by Kim Tan, October 1, 2014.

Oct 2, 2014
1 note
Thirst Turns to Desperation in Rural California
“But she has not had running water for more than five months — nor is there any tap water in her near future — because of a punishing and relentless drought in California. In the Gallegos household and more than 500 others in Tulare County, residents cannot flush a toilet, fill a drinking glass, wash dishes or clothes, or even rinse their hands without reaching for a bottle or bucket.”
The New York Times, "Thirst Turns to Desperation in Rural California" by Jennifer Medina, October 2, 2014.

Thirst Turns to Desperation in Rural California

But she has not had running water for more than five months — nor is there any tap water in her near future — because of a punishing and relentless drought in California. In the Gallegos household and more than 500 others in Tulare County, residents cannot flush a toilet, fill a drinking glass, wash dishes or clothes, or even rinse their hands without reaching for a bottle or bucket.”

The New York Times, "Thirst Turns to Desperation in Rural California" by Jennifer Medina, October 2, 2014.

Sep 15, 2014
0 notes
Pocketing Profits or Reinvesting Them?
Corporations have gone from reinvesting about 90 percent of their profits into their business in the 1970s, to about 10 percent today, William Lazonick wrote in a recentHarvard Business Review article. Profits are instead being used to pay dividends to investors and to buy back stock to boost its price, benefiting the company’s executives.
Can this trend be reversed to help fuel growth that benefits everyone?
The New York Times, "Room for Debate: Pocketing Profits or Reinvesting Them?" September 15, 2014.

Pocketing Profits or Reinvesting Them?

Corporations have gone from reinvesting about 90 percent of their profits into their business in the 1970s, to about 10 percent today, William Lazonick wrote in a recentHarvard Business Review article. Profits are instead being used to pay dividends to investors and to buy back stock to boost its price, benefiting the company’s executives.

Can this trend be reversed to help fuel growth that benefits everyone?

The New York Times, "Room for Debate: Pocketing Profits or Reinvesting Them?" September 15, 2014.

Sep 12, 2014
0 notes
Who Owns Fashion?
A debate on whether there should be more legal protection for designs.
The New York Times, “Who Owns Fashion? - Room for Debate,” September 7, 2014.

Who Owns Fashion?

A debate on whether there should be more legal protection for designs.

The New York Times, “Who Owns Fashion? - Room for Debate,” September 7, 2014.

Sep 5, 2014
1 note
Sep 3, 2014
0 notes

Court Challenge to New Inversion Rules Would Face Long Odds

"The Treasury Department is considering new regulations that would make corporate inversions less profitable. Hedge fund managers, investment bankers and others are handicapping the timing and scope of any new rules and to whom they would apply. Possibilities include further limiting earnings stripping, reclassifying certain debt held by United States subsidiaries of foreign corporations as equity or restricting the repatriation of untaxed offshore cash from corporations that have gone through an inversion.

Another question is whether any new regulations will hold up in court. Even Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew questioned whether his department had the legal authority to act unilaterally. But after Stephen E. Shay, a law professor at Harvard University, published an article urging Treasury to act, the department’s lawyers began developing some options. Mr. Shay suggested that by looking beyond Section 7874, the specific code section that addresses inversions, the Treasury Department might find other ways to curb some of the economic tax benefits of an inversion. In my view, Professor Shay’s suggestions are indeed within the lawful authority of the Treasury Department.”

The New York Times, "Court Challenge to New Inversion Rules Would Face Long Odds" by Victor Fleisher, September 3, 2014.

Aug 21, 2014
480 notes
whitehouse:

“The eyes of the nation and the world are watching Ferguson right now. The world is watching because the issues raised by the shooting of Michael Brown predate this incident. This is something that has a history to it and the history simmers beneath the surface in more communities than just Ferguson.” —Attorney General Eric Holder on visiting Ferguson yesterday to meet with community leaders, FBI investigators, and federal prosecutors to get detailed briefings on the status of the case

whitehouse:

“The eyes of the nation and the world are watching Ferguson right now. The world is watching because the issues raised by the shooting of Michael Brown predate this incident. This is something that has a history to it and the history simmers beneath the surface in more communities than just Ferguson.” —Attorney General Eric Holder on visiting Ferguson yesterday to meet with community leaders, FBI investigators, and federal prosecutors to get detailed briefings on the status of the case

Aug 11, 2014
0 notes
Inside Apple’s Internal Training Program
"…Steven P. Jobs established Apple University as a way to inculcate employees into Apple’s business culture and educate them about its history, particularly as the company grew and the tech business changed. Courses are not required, only recommended, but getting new employees to enroll is rarely a problem….
It is highly secretive and rarely written about, referred to briefly in the biography of Mr. Jobs by Walter Isaacson. Apple employees are discouraged from talking about the company in general, and the classes are no exception. No pictures of the classrooms have surfaced publicly. And a spokeswoman for Apple declined to make instructors available for interviews for this article…”
The New York Times, "Simplifying the Bull: How Picasso Helps to Teach Apple’s Style" by Brian X. Chen, August 10, 2014.

Inside Apple’s Internal Training Program

"…Steven P. Jobs established Apple University as a way to inculcate employees into Apple’s business culture and educate them about its history, particularly as the company grew and the tech business changed. Courses are not required, only recommended, but getting new employees to enroll is rarely a problem….

It is highly secretive and rarely written about, referred to briefly in the biography of Mr. Jobs by Walter Isaacson. Apple employees are discouraged from talking about the company in general, and the classes are no exception. No pictures of the classrooms have surfaced publicly. And a spokeswoman for Apple declined to make instructors available for interviews for this article…”

The New York Times, "Simplifying the Bull: How Picasso Helps to Teach Apple’s Style" by Brian X. Chen, August 10, 2014.

Navigate
« To the past Page 1 of 21
About
A legal blog dedicated to social enterprise law and new ways of thinking about business to help solve social and environmental problems.

DISCLAIMER. Please be advised that the content on this website is only for informational, educational, and entertainment purposes. Content on this website is not legal advice and cannot replace legal advice from qualified counsel. Using this website does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Subscribe via RSS.