Aug 1, 2014
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How to Learn the Law Without Law School
"California is one of a handful of states that allow apprenticeships like Mr. Tittle’s in lieu of a law degree as a prerequisite to taking the bar and practicing as a licensed lawyer. In Virginia, Vermont, Washington and California, aspiring lawyers can study for the bar without ever setting foot into or paying a law school. New York, Maine and Wyoming require a combination of law school and apprenticeship…
“Attorneys trained in this way will be able to be average people,” Ms. Orsi said, “not just because they don’t have debt, but because law school tells us that we’re really special.”
The New York Times, "The Lawyer’s Apprentice" by Sean Patrick Farrell, July 30, 2014

How to Learn the Law Without Law School

"California is one of a handful of states that allow apprenticeships like Mr. Tittle’s in lieu of a law degree as a prerequisite to taking the bar and practicing as a licensed lawyer. In Virginia, Vermont, Washington and California, aspiring lawyers can study for the bar without ever setting foot into or paying a law school. New York, Maine and Wyoming require a combination of law school and apprenticeship…

“Attorneys trained in this way will be able to be average people,” Ms. Orsi said, “not just because they don’t have debt, but because law school tells us that we’re really special.”

The New York Times, "The Lawyer’s Apprentice" by Sean Patrick Farrell, July 30, 2014

Aug 1, 2014
285 notes
Jul 31, 2014
2 notes
At Patagonia, the Bottom Line Includes the Earth

“Patagonia executives are also convinced that the many years of development and testing they have supported have resulted in a revolutionary material that will wind up not only in wet suits but also in everyday items like sneakers and yoga mats…
But if they have their way, only a few of those products will bear the Patagonia name. Instead of holding the manufacturer of the rubber, Yulex, to a yearslong exclusive contract, Patagonia is encouraging its competitors to use the product, hoping to see its use grow and drive down the price. Other wet suit and athletic apparel companies have shown interest, and Quiksilver plans to have a biorubber wet suit on the market next year.
Patagonia’s promotion of Yulex is the latest example of its unusual commitment to advancing sustainability, sometimes at the expense of its bottom line. It introduced organically grown cotton into its products in the 1990s, pushing ahead even though it lost customers and money on the transition. It has rejiggered its corporate structure so it can count success in factors that benefit the public, like helping the environment, rather than simply maximizing profit, without the fear of being sued by potential investors.”
The New York Times, “At Patagonia, the Bottom Line Includes the Earth” by Diane Cardwell, July 30, 2014.

At Patagonia, the Bottom Line Includes the Earth

Patagonia executives are also convinced that the many years of development and testing they have supported have resulted in a revolutionary material that will wind up not only in wet suits but also in everyday items like sneakers and yoga mats…

But if they have their way, only a few of those products will bear the Patagonia name. Instead of holding the manufacturer of the rubber, Yulex, to a yearslong exclusive contract, Patagonia is encouraging its competitors to use the product, hoping to see its use grow and drive down the price. Other wet suit and athletic apparel companies have shown interest, and Quiksilver plans to have a biorubber wet suit on the market next year.

Patagonia’s promotion of Yulex is the latest example of its unusual commitment to advancing sustainability, sometimes at the expense of its bottom line. It introduced organically grown cotton into its products in the 1990s, pushing ahead even though it lost customers and money on the transition. It has rejiggered its corporate structure so it can count success in factors that benefit the public, like helping the environment, rather than simply maximizing profit, without the fear of being sued by potential investors.”

The New York Times, At Patagonia, the Bottom Line Includes the Earth” by Diane Cardwell, July 30, 2014.

Jul 25, 2014
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Corporate Inversions and the Costs to Shareholders

"…Let’s pause and reflect that Medtronic is pushing a transaction that from Day 1 may cost some of its shareholders as much as 33 cents on the dollar.

The sand in the eye for the shareholders is that Congress tried to halt the tide of inversions about a decade ago. Lawmakers amended the tax code to provide that executives of companies like Medtronic that went abroad would have to pay a tax on their stock compensation. The tax is at the same capital gains tax that Medtronic’s shareholders will have to pay in connection with the transaction.

But unlike its shareholders, Medtronic’s executives will be “grossed up” by the company. Medtronic will spend millions to pay the tax obligations of its executives in connection with the transaction. At least seven other companies undertaking inversions have indemnified their executives to the tune of tens of millions of dollars, according to Bloomberg News.

But shareholders will receive nothing from Medtronic.”

The New York Times, "In Deal to Cut Corporate Taxes, Shareholders Pay the Price" by Steven Davidoff Solomon, July 8, 2014.

Jul 25, 2014
0 notes
A Japanese Artist Launches Plants Into Space
““Flowers aren’t just beautiful to show on tables,” said Makoto Azuma, a 38-year-old artist based in Tokyo. His latest installation piece, if you could call it that, takes this statement to the extreme. Two botanical objects — “Shiki 1,” a Japanese white pine bonsai suspended from a metal frame, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, hydrangeas, lilies and irises, among other blossoms — were launched into the stratosphere on Tuesday in Black Rock Desert outside Gerlach, Nevada, a site made famous for its hosting of the annual Burning Man festival. ”I wanted to see the movement and beauty of plants and flowers suspended in space,” Azuma explained that morning.
T Magazine, "A Japanese Artist Launches Plants Into Space" by Paula de la Cruz, July 18, 2014.

A Japanese Artist Launches Plants Into Space

“Flowers aren’t just beautiful to show on tables,” said Makoto Azuma, a 38-year-old artist based in Tokyo. His latest installation piece, if you could call it that, takes this statement to the extreme. Two botanical objects — “Shiki 1,” a Japanese white pine bonsai suspended from a metal frame, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, hydrangeas, lilies and irises, among other blossoms — were launched into the stratosphere on Tuesday in Black Rock Desert outside Gerlach, Nevada, a site made famous for its hosting of the annual Burning Man festival. ”I wanted to see the movement and beauty of plants and flowers suspended in space,” Azuma explained that morning.

T Magazine, "A Japanese Artist Launches Plants Into Space" by Paula de la Cruz, July 18, 2014.

Jul 23, 2014
0 notes
Small Business Case Study
A Seattle Retailer Builds on the Lessons of a Failed Store in New York
“In 2011, we published a case study on Glassybaby, a Seattle creator and retailer of hand-blown glass  cups used as candleholders. The company had opened a store in New York City, where it was struggling…Weighing her sales figures against the cost to operate in Manhattan, she closed the store in August 2012.
In the two years since then, Ms. Rhodes has taken the lessons she learned and applied them to opening a new store in San Francisco and to selling online. Today, Glassybaby offers its cups in 400 colors and employs 170 people (including 70 glassblowers). The company is on track to produce $9 million in revenue this year, up 36 percent from last year.”
The New York Times, "A Seattle Retailer Builds on the Lessons of a Failed Store in New York" by Julie Weed, July 23, 2014.
 

Small Business Case Study

A Seattle Retailer Builds on the Lessons of a Failed Store in New York

In 2011, we published a case study on Glassybaby, a Seattle creator and retailer of hand-blown glass  cups used as candleholders. The company had opened a store in New York City, where it was struggling…Weighing her sales figures against the cost to operate in Manhattan, she closed the store in August 2012.

In the two years since then, Ms. Rhodes has taken the lessons she learned and applied them to opening a new store in San Francisco and to selling online. Today, Glassybaby offers its cups in 400 colors and employs 170 people (including 70 glassblowers). The company is on track to produce $9 million in revenue this year, up 36 percent from last year.”

The New York Times, "A Seattle Retailer Builds on the Lessons of a Failed Store in New York" by Julie Weed, July 23, 2014.

 

Jul 22, 2014
23 notes
fastcompany:

As the Batman 75th anniversary further fuels the controversy over who created the Caped Crusader, a DC Comics historian offers more insight.
Read More>

fastcompany:

As the Batman 75th anniversary further fuels the controversy over who created the Caped Crusader, a DC Comics historian offers more insight.

Read More>

Jul 11, 2014
988 notes

fastcompany:

America’s Oddly Beautiful Suburban Sprawl, Photographed From The Sky

Urban sprawl is the type of thing you tend to forget about if you’re living in it, except maybe when you’re stuck in traffic inching home after work. But it does a lot more than cause road rage: Sprawl also makes us fatter, sicker, and poorer, and it’s the source of half of the country’s household carbon footprint. In a series of photos taken over seven years, now published in a new book called Ciphers, photographer Christoph Gielen shows a different perspective on sprawl, intended to get more people to question typical patterns of development.

See More>

Jul 10, 2014
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Saving Water in California

California is in the third year of its worst drought in decades. But you wouldn’t know it by looking at how much water the state’s residents and businesses are using. According to a recent state survey, Californians cut the amount of water they used in the first five months of the year by just 5 percent, far short of the 20 percent reduction Gov. Jerry Brown called for in January. In some parts of the state, like the San Diego area, water use has actually increased from 2013.”

The New York Times, "Saving Water in California" by The New York Times Editorial Board, July 9, 2014.

Jul 3, 2014
2 notes
Ruth Bader Ginsburg is emerging as an Internet sensation
"Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg garnered a lot of media attention this week for her scathing dissent on the Court’s Burwell v. Hobby Lobby ruling, and it has not all come from the usual sources. Outside the pages of major newspapers and scholarly law reviews, the dissent is fast becoming immortalized within the worlds of social media and popular culture.”
NPR, "Ruth Bader Ginsburg is Emerging as an Internet Sensation" by Nora Daly, July 2, 2014. 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg is emerging as an Internet sensation

"Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg garnered a lot of media attention this week for her scathing dissent on the Court’s Burwell v. Hobby Lobby ruling, and it has not all come from the usual sources. Outside the pages of major newspapers and scholarly law reviews, the dissent is fast becoming immortalized within the worlds of social media and popular culture.”

NPR, "Ruth Bader Ginsburg is Emerging as an Internet Sensation" by Nora Daly, July 2, 2014. 

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